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Everything You Ever Needed to Know About Finding a Mentor

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What’s all this hype about having a mentor?

Today we’ll break it down, one question at a time.

Why Bother?

First, the obvious question:  is the “mentor search” worth the energy? In a word, yes.

People who have mentors tend to get salary increases and promotions faster than workers who don’t have mentors. Graduate students in psychology report that peers who have mentors meet more influential people, move faster through the program, have a better sense of direction, and present at national conferences more often.

Although men seem to benefit from mentorship more than women do, women are in greater need of mentors because they still occupy fewer high level positions. It’s a shame, then, that Levo League found 95% of Gen Y women have never looked for a mentor.

What Type of Person Isn’t a Good Mentor?

Overstretched people make the worst mentors.

They may seem like they have it all – family, career, local fame – and you want to know how they do it. Since they have so much going on, though, they probably don’t have the time to give you the mentoring relationship you need.

For instance, Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!, may seem like an interesting mentor given her high-profile career/family juggling, but with all she’s got going on, how much time for mentoring does she actually have?

Who Makes a Good Mentor?

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Rebecca Fraser-Thill About the author: A career coach, college instructor, blogger, and speaker, Rebecca Fraser-Thill empowers young adults to lead the lives they imagined they’d have. Drawing on psychology research, a decade of work with twentysomethings, and her own quarterlife frustrations, Rebecca encourages millennials to transcend the platitudes and pursue meaningful, fulfilling lives.

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